Research Associate

Jen Johnson

Contact
Email:
jejohnson@email.arizona.edu
Room:
Bannister 322
Other Room:
Bio Sciences West, 310

Peter Brewer

Contact
Email:
pbrewer@email.arizona.edu
Phone:
520-621-0753
Room:
Bannister 405

Agnieszka Helman-Wazny

Contact
Email:
agniwaz@email.arizona.edu
Phone:
+1 520 621 5391
Room:
Bannister 400A-3

Ellis Margolis

Contact
Email:
ellisqm@ltrr.arizona.edu
Webpage:

Fire ecology, fire climatology, quaking aspen ecology, and applications of these fields to natural resource management.

Current Research

  • Historical fire-climate relationships of upper elevation forests, southwestern U.S.
  • Post-fire quaking aspen regeneration – Lassen NP, CA
  • Fire history and streamflow recosntructions, Santa Fe Watershed, NM
  • Age and spatial structure of frequently burned Ponderosa pine forests, Gila, NM
  • Forest structure and fire history at the PJ/Ponderosa ecotone, Rowe Mesa, NM
  • Tree-ring corroboration of modeled NPP, Santa Fe Watershed, NM
  • Tree-ring reconstruction of Jemez Mountain Salamander habitat, Jemez Mtns, NM

Links

CV

Matthew Salzer

Contact
Email:
msalzer@ltrr.arizona.edu
Phone:
+1 (520) 621-2946
Room:
Bannister 420
Other Room:
Bannister 409

CV

Tree Rings, Paleoclimate, Environmental Change, and Cultural-Environmental Interaction

Dr. Salzer’s current research involves the construction and interpretation of multi-millennial bristlecone pine tree-ring chronologies. These chronologies provide information regarding past environmental and climate change in western North America and the impact of such change on human and other biotic populations.

This research program investigates the role of climate as a driver of ecosystem variability and environmental change. Dr. Salzer's interests merge techniques from dendrochronology, paleoclimatology, biogeography, and archaeology. These interests center around two connected themes. First, developing long histories of climate variability in western North America. This involves the development of annually resolved, spatially explicit tree-ring based reconstructions of temperature and hydoclimatic variables to identify the range of climatic variability in the system. Reconstructions such as these are an important component of developing informed policies that address the impacts of global warming. They also contribute to understanding the drivers and mechanisms related to climate and environmental change within longer-term contexts. The second research focus centers on the influence of climatic change on the cultural-ecological landscape with particular attention to the response of human societies to change as evidenced in the archaeological record. While each of these themes can be pursued alone, the strength of this approach lies in linking these themes in order to provide a foundation for comparing current evidence for climatic/ecosystem change with changes of the past, and thus the ability to guide and inform plans that address long-term sustainability.

Dick Warren

Contact
Email:
ward@ltrr.arizona.edu
Phone:
+1 (520) 621-2320
Room:
Bannister 309A

Richard Warren, Research Associate in Dendrochronology, received a B.A. degree in Anthropology from The University of Arizona in 1962 and has been at the Laboratory since 1964. Warren is the most experienced and accomplished dendrochronological technician in the world, maintaining unmatched high rates of analytical speed, accuracy, and reliability. He developed and honed his tree-ring skills as a principal analytical contributor to the Dendrochronology of Southwestern United States Project, an NSF-sponsored reanalysis of the LTRR’s archaeological tree-ring sample holdings that extended from 1963 through 1975. Since that time, he has been responsible for numerous archaeological assignments and has participated in many field collection operations including archaeological sampling with the Three-Mile Draw, Tsegi, Chetro Ketl, Walpi, and Acoma projects and living-tree coring for several phases of the Southwest Paleoclimate project. Through the years, he has served as a general dating “troubleshooter” for the LTRR, providing chronological quality control for a wide range of research projects involving several principal investigators. In addition to archaeological dating, his experience includes analyzing bristlecone pine samples, dating and measuring living-tree samples for dendroclimatic analysis, constructing long tree-ring chronologies for Alaska and the Southwest, geological tree-ring dating, preparing samples for non-dendrochronological analysis, and checking other technicians’ crossdating and chronology construction. He also assisted in teaching laboratory sections of the Introduction to Dendrochronology course, delivering lectures to visiting groups, and guiding tours of the Laboratory. Finally, he supervised the LTRR’s shop, maintaining and repairing equipment, requisitioning supplies, training individuals in the use of shop machines, and ensuring a safe working environment for the users of this facility. Warren officially retired from the University in 2004 but continues to work half-time in the archaeological dating program.

During the last seven years, Warren analyzed 8,833 archaeological and living-tree tree-ring samples and derived 3,067 dates. During this period, he reanalyzed the Harvard Peabody Museum’s tree-ring sample collection from Awatovi, a large prehistoric-historic period Hopi site in northern Arizona. Major accomplishments include: analyzing archaeological tree-ring samples from sites in northern Sonora; the production of dates that illuminate the prehistory and history of the Four Corners area, the Navajo homeland in Dinétah, the Upper Pecos River Valley, northern Colorado, and central New Mexico; preparing dated wood samples for exhibits at several museums and Park Service facilities; analysis of wood samples designed to characterize the environmental history of the Mesa Verde National Park pinyon-juniper woodland over the last 500 years; and checking the dating of samples for research projects directed by J. S. Dean, R. H. Towner, I. Panyushkina, and L. N. Ababneh.

Kiyomi Morino

Contact
Email:
kmorino@ltrr.arizona.edu
Room:
Bannister 422

hydrology, ecology, cottonwood; San Pedro River

Christopher (Kit) OʼConnor

Contact
Email:
kitoconnor@yahoo.com
Room:
BioSci East 207A

Tyson Swetnam

Contact
Email:
tswetnam@gmail.com
Phone:
+1 (520) 621-5211
Room:
Environment and Natural Res. 2
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