Research Specialist, Sr.

Josh Farella

Contact
Email:
farella1@email.arizona.edu
Room:
Bannister 300A-7
Josh Farella picture

Martin Munro

Contact
Email:
mmunro@ltrr.arizona.edu
Phone:
+1 (520) 429-2944
Room:
Bannister 322
Webpage:

Dr. Munro, Research Specialist, Sr. originally trained as an archaeologist, receiving an M.A. from the University of Edinburgh in 1978. His studies included a one-year course in computer science, and he wrote software to display and manipulate large sets of magnetometer and conductivity readings, since his early research interests included applying geophysical techniques to archeological site surveys.

Munro’s Ph.D. studies were based in the Palaeoecology Centre at the Queen’s University of Belfast, but involved collaborations and fieldwork with archaeologists in Denmark, using pollen analysis to learn more of the farming practices during the Scandinavian Pre-Roman and Roman Iron Age. His laboratory work included extensive experience with optical microscopy, and before he graduated in 1983 he had already become involved in the other research work at the Palaeoecology Center, notably dendrochronology and ^14^C dating. As a postdoctoral research assistant he wrote Cross84 (a program to crossdate tree-ring series that is still used in some institutions), and helped archive a large collection of tree-ring data. He was employed to administer PDP-11 minicomputers in a laboratory setting, provided advice on statistical and database problems, and taught undergraduate courses on European prehistory and on basic computer skills. His first visit to the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona was in 1987, when he spent two months helping with data analysis for a project on the effects of increasing atmospheric CO~2~ concentrations on tree-ring chronologies. Between 1988 and 1991 he worked in the Department of Geography at University College London, helping produce a large palaeolimnological database.

He has worked at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research since 1991, where he is responsible for computer system and network administration, and provides support to several projects applying image analysis techniques to dendrochronology. Munro has helped produce a system for measuring cell dimensions within conifer tree rings, by adding custom-written code to the NIH Image software, and participated in a joint project with the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering to develop a semi-automated system for tree-ring crossdating and measurement (TREES). He revised the LTRR’s database of site collection information, and has experience of programming in C, C++, Ruby, Pascal, Scheme, Fortran, assembler, Java, and Perl, including CGI programming for Web servers. He administers the LTRR’s ten Linux-based servers, including the email system (first established in 1992), although he is now delegating some of the network administration to the central University computing services (UITS).

Chris Guiterman

Contact
Email:
chguiterman@email.arizona.edu
Room:
Bannister 300A-6

Rex Adams

Contact
Email:
radams@ltrr.arizona.edu
Phone:
+1 (520) 626-3617
Room:
Bannister 400A-10
Webpage:

Rex Adams, Research Specialist, Sr., has a 1967 double major B.A. in Chemistry and Sociology/Anthropology from Adams State College, Alamosa, Colorado. In 1980 he received a M.A. degree in Anthropology from Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, New Mexico. He joined The University of Arizona staff in August 1980 at the Arizona State Museum. In July of 1981, he became a research technician employee of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research. From July 1981 to October 1986, he worked with other LTRR staff members on collecting, preparing, crossdating and measuring increment cores from California, Oregon, Idaho and Nevada. This was a National Science Foundation supported project which resulted in the publication of Tree-Ring Chronologies of Western North America: California, Eastern Oregon and Northern Great Basin with Procedures Used in the Chronology Development Work including Users Manuals for computer Programs COFECHA and ARSTAN, Chronology Series VI, 1986. This basic research has provided the data for many additional research projects, students’ (both undergraduate and graduate) papers and degrees and fostered cooperation in planning efforts between various governmental agencies.

From October 1986 to January 1990, he was involved in field collections, sample preparation, crossdating and measuring of bristlecone pine and foxtail pine samples from across the Great Basin to the Front Range of the Colorado Rockies and the crest area of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California. During this same time period, he was involved in the field collection, preparation, crossdating and measuring of nine different conifer species from Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado as part of a multidisciplinary baseline study of the health of western conifer forests by the Environmental Protection Agency.

In January of 1990, he became a full-time state supported staff member of the LTRR. His duties and responsibilities in this position include teaching the laboratory portion of the 464/564 course Introduction to Dendrochronology and the 497/597 course Workshop in Dendrochronology. He has also been the laboratory instructor for the BIOC 597 course for secondary school teachers. He is responsible for teaching and training visiting scholars (both national and international) who then return to their home locations to set up programs in dendrochronology research. He is responsible for organizing the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research Outreach Program, which involves visiting K-12 schools in the Tucson area and other locations in southern Arizona to provide students with face to face and hands-on experience with tree-ring information and samples. Schools are also invited to visit the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, and each year many teachers make arrangements for such visits. Local civic groups such as Kiwanis and Optimists Club are also visited and/or come to the LTRR. University of Arizona classes are also given tours of the Laboratory facilities each semester. Samples are also provided to museum and school facilities for permanent display. He has also been responsible, in part, for building shelf sets and organizing the very large permanent archive collection of dendrochronological wood samples from around the world.

Over the past six years he has participated in an ongoing project to update and extend the bristlecone pine chronology from the White Mountains of California. This important and unique research has remained a fruitful avenue for exploring the history of global climate change and providing the underpinning of geochronology for the radiocarbon community over the past 50 years and promises to continue to provide insight in the future.

Contact
Email:
jparks@email.arizona.edu
Phone:
+1 (520) 621-2320
Room:
Bannister 309
Webpage:

Jim Parks, Research Specialist, Sr., earned a B.A. degree in history and classics from The University of Arizona in 1990. In 1987, he began his career in dendrochronology as a student asssitant to D. A. Graybill working on bristlecone pine dating, verification, and chronology building. In 1991, he transferred to the archaeological research program where he has worked on a variety of projects. Parks has participated in a number of field projects including bristlecone pine collecting for the "Early Holocene Dendrochronology and Calibration of C-14 Dating" project (Graybill, J. S. Dean, and D. J. Donohue PIs); living tree sampling in connection with chronology building and dendroclimatic studies undertaken by Graybill, Dean, and T. W. Swetnam; living and dead tree sampling for a pinyon dieback study in the Sevilleta NSF Long-Term Environmental Research Area with Swetnam and J. L. Betancourt of the USGS; buried and flood scarred-tree sampling for geological studies by V. A. S. McCord; and archaeological sampling at sites in Mesa Verde National Park under Dean's supervision.. In addition, he helped collect and prepare samples for radiocarbon dating, trace element analysis, and geological dating. As a student, Parks was awarded both the Alsie French Schulman and Edmund Schulman Memorial Scholarship and the Andrew Ellicott Douglass Memorial Scholarship by the the Laboratory, and well as receiving two undergraduate research grants from The University of Arizona Honors Center.

During the last seven years (written in 1999), Parks analyzed 2,036 archaeological tree-ring samples, resulting in 809 dates. He analyzed nearly 500 samples from dead bristlecone and pinyon remnants, and analyzed nearly 700 cores from living trees. Included in these efforts were the dating of numerous samples from six cliff dwellings in Mesa Verde National Park and preparing reports on two of these, one of which is in press. He analyzed 4,000-year-old buried geological samples from Carnegie canyon, Oklahoma, as part of a study of climatic variablility in the Holocene. In another study, he helped document recent changes in spring discharge in northeastern Arizona. In connection with the Sevilleta project, Parks undertook chronology building and dendroclimatic reconstructions that were incorporated into a paper (now in press) on the role of drought in eighteenth century population dislocations in the Rio Grande Valley. Finally, he assisted M.W. Salzer in extending the San Francisco Peaks bristlecone chronology back to 662 B.C., an addition of more than 1,000 years. This chronology will be used in conjunction with local ponderosa pine sequences to investigate interactions between precipitation and temperature in the Flagstaff area over the last 1,500 years.

Since 2004, as the primary NSF-funded technician, Parks has analyzed 5076 archaeological samples, deriving 1616 dates. He also assisted Ron Towner, reanalyzing and deriving additional dates from the Navajo Land Claim material collected in the 1960s. In addition to his duties in the Southwest Dendroarchaeology Program, he assisted Paul Sheppard, collecting tree-ring samples and laying out sensors for an air pollution study in the San Jacinto and San Gorgonio Mountains of California; and he worked with Matt Salzer collecting high-elevation living and remnant bristlecone pines in the Great Basin over several seasons. Jim is currently the senior dating specialist for the Southwestern Dendroarchaeology Program. 

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