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Tree rings and the Truckee River: paralleling the past and the present

The Truckee River Basin, located on the Nevada-California border, is an area of extreme hydrologic variability, being subject to both prolonged multi-decadal droughts and devastating floods; however, due to its brief instrumental record, understanding the full range of this variability is limited. To address concerns over the potential severity of the current post-2000 drought, I created a new streamflow reconstruction of the Truckee River.

A spatial field reconstruction of North American summer air temperatures derived from a tree-ring blue intensity network 

Spatially-resolved climate field reconstructions are opportune for analyzing spatial anomaly patterns and characterizing regional-scale trends resultant from climate change. To date, few fine-scale (<5o by 5o) spatially-resolved paleo-temperature datasets exist in the Northern Hemisphere, especially those with representation of locations below 40oN.

A multimillennial snow water equivalent reconstruction from giant sequoia tree rings

The first dendroclimatic reconstruction of May 1 Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) was developed from a Sequoiadendron giganteum regional tree-ring chronology network of 23 sites in central California for the period 90-2012 CE. The reconstruction is based on a significant relationship between May 1 SWE and tree-ring growth and shows climate variability from inter-annual to inter-centennial time scales. A regression-based reconstruction equation explains up to 55% of the variance of SWE for 1940-2012.

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